Tryouts – making your first vlogs

When I became serious about vlogging, I decided I had to make some tryouts. So I took my phone and recorded a message in which I announced the vlog. I immediately made two big mistakes: I filmed vertically and while holding the phone in my hand. The result was shaky and in vertical and therefore inappropriate for youtube.

I had put quite some effort in creating an intro video to add to each movie, complete with theme music without copyrights. However, after having edited my movie and mixed it all together, I found the intro was too long. People don’t have a very long attention span and tend to watch only one minute of any video. You should therefore capture your audience in the first 15 to 30 seconds and it is advisable to make short videos.

For the second tryout, I put the phone on the only peace of furniture I could find which was high enough for me to stand in front of and with a relatively neutral background. These tryouts showed me I could record and edit a quick video in about an hour, even if I didn’t really use a script. It therefore gave me a good sense of what it would be like to be a vlogger – how much time it would cost me to record and edit a video and what the videos could look like.

These videos were not posted to youtube, but you can see the tryouts in this Google Photoalbum which doubles as a blog post.

What did you do to learn to vlog? What was your tryout and did you post it online?

Do you know Casey’s tryout? Tell us of any other tryouts (including your own) in the comments!

 

 


My name is Cheryl. I’m Learning to vlog for Rural Web Africa
Follow me: LinkedIn | Youtube |InstagramNewsletter
Join my learning circle on Facebook

The Greening Plastic Project-video

In July 2017 I visited Senegal with a colleague to visit our partners of the Greening Plastic Project. I am the project leader of this innovative recycling project which is financed by VIA Water and DAWCA. In the project, we support a local enterprise (SME) which is transitioning from creating plastic tubes towards creating recycled plastic tubes for drip-irrigation systems. The role of Deltares (for which I work) is to assess whether these plastic tube do not pose any threat to the environment or to the humans who will eventually eat the produce of the irrigated land. This project allows us to pilot an innovative soil- and water quality monitoring technique – Passive sampling – in Africa.

One of the requirements of VIA Water is that we regularly post updates about the project to our VIA Water project website. So to that end we are always on the lookout for things we can post: photos and stories. And because of that, I made a lot of photos and some videos during our stay. Back at home, I started to edit them on my phone, as I was used to do with holiday videos. The result was surprising: it told a story.

The quality of that video, however, is abominably bad. Due to editing on my phone, using both horizontal and vertical photos  and video, it became a complex thing to edit and I should actually redo it..

Nonetheless, the video proved to be very useful to send to people who were interested in the project to give them a quick idea of what we were about. The video also quickly collected about 70 views, which strengthened my idea that it would be interesting to make even more videos about my work, or even start a vlog.

More about the Greening Plastic Project:

 

 


My name is Cheryl. I’m Learning to vlog for Rural Web Africa
Follow me: LinkedIn | Youtube |InstagramNewsletter
Join my learning circle on Facebook